My email address is jorge.ggmenendez@uchicago.edu. 
You can directly e-mail me from here.

1155 E 60th Street, Room 429
Chicago, IL
US

+ 001 (773)-677-7938

I am a National Council for Science and Technology (Conacyt) Fellow in the Department of Economics at the University of Chicago. I graduated summa cum laude and as valedictorian from CIDE (Mexico) in 2010 with a B.A. in Economics. I visited the University of Chicago in the winter and spring of 2009 as an undergraduate student and received and M.A. in Economics from this university in 2012.

     I am currently a third year Ph.D. student. My research interests include Family Economics, Human Capital Formation and Accumulation, and the Quantitative Study of Socio-Economic Inequality. My current research focuses in two areas: (i) formal and informal labor and credit markets; (ii) early childhood human capital formation and accumulation. The main objective of my research is to understand how market structures and investment choices determine life-cycle and cross-sectional inequality.

Research

These are the links to my publications and working papers.

PUBLICATIONS

Peer-reviewed

1. Early Childhood Education and Crime (with James J. Heckman and Anna L. Ziff). 2019. Infant Mental Health Journal. 40:1.

2. Gender Differences in the Benefits of an Influential Early Childhood Program (with James J. Heckman and Anna L. Ziff) European Economic Review. 109 (2018). Other: NBER WP Version. Appendix.

3. The Price of Fringe Benefits when Formal and Informal Labor Markets Coexist (with David Argente). 2015. IZA Journal of Labor Economics. 3:14.

4. Why Do Formal Credit, Informal Credit, and both Types of Credits Coexist as Consumer Choices? (with Víctor G. Carreón and Sonia Di Giannatale). 2015. Economics Bulletin. 35:1. Other: Data Appendix.

Not Peer-Reviewed

5. Social Policy: Targeting Programmes Effectively (with James J. Heckman). 2017. Nature Human Behavior 1:0019.

6. Early Childhood Education (with Sneha Elango, James J. Heckman, & Andres Hojman). 2016. Economics of Means-Tested Transfer Programs in the United States, Volume II. The University of Chicago Press, edited by Robert Moffitt.

Working Papers

7. Quantifying the Life-cycle Benefits of a Prototypical Early Childhood Program (with James J. Heckman, Duncan Ermini Leaf, and María José Prados). 2018 (resubmitted, Journal of Political Economy). Other: Appendix.

8. The Household- and Aggregate-Level Fertility Consequences of China's One-Child Policy. (New draft here soon).